News

2017

December

  • Sunday 10th December, 9pm. A BBC1 documentary 'Jumbo: The Life Of An Elephant Superstar' presented by David Attenborough who investigates the remarkable life and death of Jumbo the elephant – a celebrity animal superstar whose story is said to have inspired the movie Dumbo. The documentary includes staff from both University of Nottingham (Holly Miller) and the BGS (Angela Lamb).

October

  • New editor for Nature Scientific Reports. Congratulations to Prof Melanie Leng who has been appointed on to the editorial board of Nature Scientific Reports. Nature Scientific Reports sits within the nature family of journals and covers all areas of the natural sciences. The journal is open access and continuous online publication enables articles to be published swiftly. The journal has over a million article page views per month. Scientific Reports currently has an Impact Factor of 5.228 (2015).

September

  • Congratulations to Melanie Leng who has been invited to sit on the Australian Research Councils “Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage’s (CABAH) Centre Advisory Committee” for a 2 year term. The CABAH funds research to safeguard Australia’s national heritage, transform research culture, connect with communities and inform policy. By tracking the natural and human history of Australia, Papua New Guinea and eastern Indonesia, they aim to fill vast gulfs of knowledge to protect Australia’s assets. The CABAH is funded by substantial grants from the Australian Research Council, the NSW Government, and participating universities, museums, and organisations.

July

  • Congratulations! Fiona Sach was awarded 1st prize in her year group for a presentation at the University of Nottingham School of Biosciences postgraduate conference. The presentation was about Fiona's PhD which is looking at the question "Are Land Use Decisions of African Elephants based on Environmental Geochemistry?". The project is focusing on the Phalaborwa mine in South Africa and if the unique geochemistry surrounding the mine is attracting the elephants to the area and providing them with minerals which the elephants require. Unfortunately when the elephants enter the mining area, they cause human elephant conflict which risks elephant and human life and causes loss of income.
    More about Fiona’s project.

June

  • Research funding: Congratulations to staff within the Schools of Geography who have received NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility funding at the Spring 2016 meeting for the following research projects:
    • IP-1711-0517: Dr J Dean (Hull) and Prof M Leng (Nottingham) - Did the African Humid Period termination in southern Ethiopia really take ~1000 years?
    • IP-1727-0517: Dr S McGowan, Dr G Swann, Prof M Leng (Nottingham) - How have hydrological impoundments and eutrophication changed organic matter cycling in shallow freshwater ecosystems of the Middle Yangtze Basin?
    • IP-1733-0517: Dr J Pike (Cardiff), Dr G Swann and Prof M Leng (Nottingham) - Tracing icebergs around East Antarctica - an indication of past ice sheet dynamics?
    • IP-1740-0517: Dr G Swann and Prof M Leng (Nottingham) - Reconstructing upwelling, nutrient supply, and the efficiency of the biological pump in the Bering Sea since the middle Pleistocene, using diatom silicon isotope records.

May

  • New Funding: Congratulations to staff in the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry who have won an NERC Newton Fund institutional links grant (Mexico): Valuable wetlands – mapping of wetland ecosystem services for climate regulation. The project combines on the ground collection, laboratory measurement and upscaling using satellite and modelling to provide an integrated tool for assessing the economic value of wetland forests. The project is led by Dr Sofie Sjogersten (UoN) and includes assessment of wetland carbon by Rock–Eval with Dr Christopher Vane (BGS) and application of remote sensing by Dr Doreen Boyd (UoN) and co–workers.

April

  • New appointment: Melanie Leng has been invited to join the Editorial Board of Quaternary Research. Quaternary Research is an international journal devoted to the advancement of the interdisciplinary understanding of the Quaternary Period. They aim to publish articles of broad interest with relevance to more than one discipline, and that constitute a significant new contribution to Quaternary science.
  • New Funding: Congratulations to staff in the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry who have won an AHRC grant: Exploring the Easter E.G. – Shifting Baselines and Changing Perceptions of Cultural and Biological Aliens. The project is a collaboration between PI Dr Naomi Sykes UoN, Dr Phillip Shaw (University of Leicester) and Prof Gregor Larson (University of Oxford). The project will focus on the animals associated with Easter – the brown hare, rabbit and chicken. These animals are all "alien" to Britain and the project seeks to understand their origins and domestication, including the application of stable isotope analysis in collaboration with Dr Angela Lamb (BGS/UoN) and Dr Holly Miller (UoN/BGS).
  • New Funding: Congratulations to staff in the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry who have won an AHRC grant: Going Places: Empowering Women, Enhancing Heritage and Increasing Chicken Production in Ethiopia. The project seeks to address the position of women in Ethiopia and the role that chicken production has within this. The project is led by Dr Naomi Sykes (UoN/BGS) and includes the application of stable isotope analysis in collaboration with Dr Angela Lamb (BGS/UoN) and Dr Holly Miller (UoN/BGS).

March

  • New Funding: Congratulations to staff in the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (Suzanne McGowan and Michael Watts) who have won a NERC Standard Grant to work on: "Ecological effects of glacial dust deposition on remote Arctic lakes" with the Loughborough University (John Anderson and Joanna Bullard). This grant brings together a dynamic team with complementary skills and experience, notably in dust dynamics, Arctic limnology (in particular, experimental limnology, algal ecology and nutrient dynamics) and geochemistry. The proposal builds on these four complementary research strands to allow an integrated analysis of dust particle size and deposition rates, its chemical composition and its ecological effects in nutrient–limited lakes.
  • Visiting Researchers: The CEG have two Commonwealth Scholarship Council–UK Professional Fellows visiting from Kenya and Zimbabwe in April for two months. This is part of the Royal Society–DFID Capacity building project.
  • Research News: Diriba Kumssa has recently been welcomed to the Magnesium Network (MAG-NET): Integrating Soil-Crop-Animal Pathways to Improve Ruminant Health project as a new post-doctoral research associate within the team. This project is funded by a BBSRC-NERC Sustainable Agriculture Research and Innovation Club (SARIC) grant (2016-2020), collaborating across the School of Biosciences and School of Veterinary Medicine and Science at UoN, Inorganic Geochemistry at BGS and the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) at Aberystwyth University. Project PIs are Professor Martin Broadley (School of Biosciences, UoN), Dr Louise Ander (Inorganic Geochemistry, BGS) and Alan Lovatt (IBERS, Aberystwyth University).
  • Research News: MSc student Jonathan Craggs (UoN Geography) will be working with Organic Geochemistry Facility at BGS from mid-April to July to assist in the development of the measurement and modelling of dermal bioavailability of organic compounds in soils for human health risk assessment of brown field land. Jonathan's research will address how to consistently apply soil to artificial skin as well as tackle the effect of time on the transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil into and through humans via the skin. This student project augments a programme of industry led research into human exposure to potentially harmful organic compounds in soil and is supervised by a joint BGS/UoN team (Paul Nathanial, Chris Vane, Darren Beriro and Mark Cave) with additional industrial steer from WSP-PB and National Grid Property Holdings.
  • PhD position: Measuring and modelling the dermal bioavailability of organic compounds in soil for human health risk assessment of brownfield land (fully funded fees and stipend for UK/EU applicants).
    More information

February

  • New Funding: Congratulations to staff in the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry who have won a Newton Fund RCUK-Partnerships Call grant to work on Assessing human impacts on the Red River system, Vietnam, to enable sustainable management. The grant is headed by Suzanne McGowan at the University of Nottingham. The project aims to provide an updated, detailed and process-based overview of macronutrient fluxes and pollutant distribution, to fill in knowledge gaps of C, N, P and Si processing and produce an improved model using Materials Flow Analysis for scenario planning in the Red River Delta, Vietnam.

January

  • New appointment: Congratulations to Jack Lacey who has been made Treasurer of the Quaternary Research Association. The QRA – is an organisation comprising archaeologists, botanists, civil engineers, geographers, geologists, soil scientists, zoologists and others interested in research into the problems of the Quaternary.

2016

December

  • New Visiting Research Associate: Congratulations to Dr Kara Bogus (IODP, Texas A&M University) who has been appointed as a Visiting Research Associate at the British Geological Survey within the Stable Isotope Facility and the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry. Kara is an organic geochemist and her research interests are in formation and alteration of marine kerogen; organic matter diagenesis and preservation; geochemical composition of organic microfossils and sources of variability; development of organic microfossil composition as a kerogenproxy. Kara will be working with Sev Kender and Melanie Leng on reconstructing Bay of Bengal palaeoceanography since the Miocene.
  • Research funding: Congratulations to the staff in Geography who have secured a NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility funding at the Autumn 2016 meeting for the following research project:
    • IP–1674–1116: Dr S Kender and Dr G Swann – Investigating sea ice and Bering Sea palaeoceanography during the middle Pleistocene global climatic shift.

November

  • Visiting Research Associate: Congratulations to Prof Paul Nathanail (School of Geography) who has been made a Visiting research Associate with the British Geological Survey. Paul is Professor of Engineering Geology and Managing Director of Land Quality Management Ltd. His research, teaching and consultancy interests span the spectrum of risk based contaminated land management and sustainable urban regeneration.
  • Darren Beriro has been awarded a prestigious NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellowship to improve the understanding and utilisation of NERC geoscience by the brownfield redevelopment sector in the UK. The Fellowship starts in December 2016 and lasts for 3 years. Darren will work with landowners, developers and geoenvironmental consultants through a series of workshops and one-to-one shadowing projects. CEG science that is part of the project includes bespoke analytical methods that estimate the human exposure of potentially harmful chemicals in soil and assist with the source apportionment of chemicals present in hazardous waste.
    For further information contact darrenb@bgs.ac.uk
  • The British Geological Survey, University of Nottingham and WSP | PB are jointly supervising two exciting PhD studentship opportunities that are currently being advertised by the Envision and STARS doctoral training schemes. Each will be fully funded for home/EU applicants and will focus on different aspects of the dermal bioavailability of organic soil contaminants and will form part of a programme of work funded by National Grid Property Holdings. The first of these studentships is entitled: "Measurement and modelling human dermal bioavailability of potentially harmful organic soil contaminants"
    More information
  • Postdoctoral researcher post: A 2 year 9 month researcher position is available to work on the 'Magnesium Network (MAG-NET): Integrating Soil-Crop-Animal Pathways to Improve Ruminant Health' project funded by the BBSRC/NERC Sustainable Agriculture Research and Innovation Club (SARIC). This interdisciplinary role will include experimental and sampling work on forage grasses, as well as assisting with on-farm veterinary audits, and integrating datasets from across the project. The post will be in the School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, working closely with the academic partners, BGS and IBERS (Aberystwyth University), as well as industry partners. For further information please contact Prof Martin Broadley. Applications must be made through the University of Nottingham portal by the closing date of 28th November 2016.
  • Postdoctoral researcher position: A 3 year researcher position is available to work at BGS, in conjunction with the School of Biosciences University of Nottingham, using stochastic spatial modelling techniques to quantify how plant root systems modify the physical structure of the soil during their development, and how plant and microbial processes in soil combine to control the dynamics of soil structure. For further details please contact Prof Murray Lark. Applications must be made through the UK Shared Business Services Ltd by the closing date of 20th November 2016.

October

  • PhD position: A PhD available through Envision DPT on Biological and biogeochemical proxy calibration of deglaciating environments in Antarctica. For further details, please contact Prof James Scourse (j.scourse@bangoe.ac.uk). This project will provide an excellent and rare opportunity for the student to participate in research cruises and fieldwork in Antarctica. This research is collaboration between the Universities of Bangor and Nottingham, the British Geological Survey and the British Antarctic Survey. Applicants should make their applications through the Envision website online application by 10am on Friday 6th January 2017.
  • PhD position: A PhD available through Envision DPT on: Reconstructing 2000 years of hydrological change in Africa – implications for future climate scenarios. For further details, please contact Dr Keely Mills (kmil@bgs.ac.uk) or Dr Matt Jones (matthew.jones@nottingham.ac.uk). As part of this studentship the successful candidate will have the opportunity to undertake fieldwork in Uganda, and develop research links with colleagues based in overseas institutions. This research is collaboration between the British Geological Survey and the University of Nottingham (the combined Centre for Environmental Geochemistry). All applicants should make their application through the Envision website online application by 10am on Friday 6th January 2017.

September

  • The following abstracts were presented by CEG staff at the International Conference in Palaeoceanography, held between 27th August and 4th September 2016 in Utrecht, Netherlands.
    • Dejardin, R, Allen, C, Kender, S, Leng, M, Peck, V, Swann, G. A multiproxy palaeoceanographic record of the deglacial and Holocene from the Subantarctic island of South Georgia (P–118). International Conference in Palaeoceanography, August 2016, Urecht, Netherlands.
    • Detlef, H, Sosdian, S, Hall, I R, Lear, C H, Kender, S, Leng, M J, Belt, S T. Mid–Pleistocene oceanography in the Bering Sea – Insights from deep ocean temperature, continental ice volume, and sea ice records (P–467). International Conference in Palaeoceanography, August 2016, Urecht, Netherlands.
    • Pike, J, Swann, G, Leng, M, Snelling, A. A Holocene record of giant iceberg calving from the Amery Ice Shelf, Prydz Bay (P–545). International Conference in Palaeoceanography, August 2016, Urecht, Netherlands.
    • Worne, S, Kender, S, Swann, G, Stroynowski, Z, Leng, M. Investigating sea ice, productivity and intermediate water evolution in the Bering Sea over the Mid–Pleistocene Transition (0–1.2 Ma) (P–592). International Conference in Palaeoceanography, August 2016, Urecht, Netherlands.
  • The following abstracts were presented by CEG staff at the International Geological Congress help between 27th August and 4th September 2016 in Cape Town, South Africa.
    • Bogus, K A B, Fox, L R, Kender, S, Leng, M, and the Exp. 354 science party. Stable isotopes from planktonic and benthic foraminifera: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 354 (Bengal Fan). International Geological Congress, 2016, Cape Town, South Africa.
    • Kender, S, Ravelo, A C, Hall, I R, Leng, M J, Becker, J, Worne, S, Aiello, I W, Asahi, H, and Andreasen, D. Oceanographic and climate changes during the Mid Pleistocene uncovered from Bering Sea and Pacific Ocean sediment cores. International Geological Congress, 2016, Cape Town, South Africa.

June

  • Research Funding: Congratulations to staff within Geography who have received NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility funding at the Spring 2016 meeting for the following research projects:
    • IP–1619–0516: Dr G Swann & Dr K Hendry (Bristol) – Oxygen isotope systematics of deep–sea sponges from the North Atlantic.
    • IP–1623–0516: Dr J Dean and Prof M Leng – Climate change and human dispersal over the past 115 000 years in east Africa.

May

  • Visitors: Through May the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry hosted four PhD students for a training secondment as part of the Royal Society–DFID Capacity building project (2015–2020) with partners in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe, in addition to a senior laboratory technician from the University of Zimbabwe funded by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Their supervisory team (comprising of leading scientists from paired Agricultural Research Institutes and Universities from each country and a nutritional health scientist from Addis Ababa University) also attended for a shorter period of project planning, progress presentations and discussion of future funding opportunities. This leg of the secondment included a symposia involving four instrument manufacturers who demonstrated equipment appropriate for the African environment, as well as a research symposia, with presentations from 18 PhD students, technical staff and a Royal Society administrator. The Royal Society–DFID Capacity building project is headed by Michael Watts (BGS) and Martin Broadley (UoN).

March

  • Research News: Well done to Profs Ritz, Mooney, Bennet (UoN) and Dr Murray Lark (BGS) who have won a BBSRC responsive mode grant to work on the interaction of crop roots and soil microbes in the dynamics of soil structure. It will be an exciting new application of special modelling methods.
  • Research News: We have recently gained funding to undertake a project entitled 'Are land–use decisions of African elephants based on environmental geochemistry?' via three sources: PhD student from the NERC Envision DTP, Hermes travel bursary and the Royal Society International Exchange scheme. The project is based on a CEG collaboration between the Inorganic Geochemistry and Stable Isotopes teams at BGS and Schools of Biosciences and Veterinary Science at the University of Nottingham. The collaboration is further strengthened by partners in five UK zoos and with partners in South Africa with a history of working with elephants in Kruger park.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Jack Lacey for successfully defending his PhD thesis: "Late Quaternary Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction from Lake Ohrid." Jack did his PhD within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry at the University of Nottingham and the British Geological Survey and was supervised by Prof Melanie Leng and Dr Matthew Jones.

February

  • Research funding: Congratulations to the staff in Geography (and BAS) who have secured a NERC Radiocarbon Facility grant from the Autumn 2015 meeting:
    • 1944.1015: Rowan Dejardin (PhD student), Dr Sev Kender, Prof Melanie Leng, Dr George Swann (and Dr Vicky Peck and Dr Claire Allen, both BAS) – Assessing Holocene variability in oceanographic conditions around the Subantarctic island of South Georgia.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Stefan Engels (UoN) who has been appointed as a Visiting Research Associate at the British Geological Survey. Stefan's research aims are to better understand natural and anthropogenic processes that drive environmental change in the recent past through materials deposited in lake sediments. In his current project Stefan combines classic palaeoecological proxies and novel geochemical techniques to investigate recent human impacts (including pollution, land development, invasive species, hydrological modification and climate change) on Asian lakes and wetlands.
  • Press release: Exploring the depths of the South Atlantic Ocean since the last Ice Age. A team of researchers have discovered that the increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere during the last ice age did not result from reduced density of the deep ocean as previously thought. In the first study of its kind, the team, made up of researchers from The University of Nottingham (Dr Sev Kender), the University of Cambridge and the British Antarctic Survey, were able to disprove the theory that the CO2 (that came from the depths of the ocean), was released because deep water became less dense, able to overturn, and ventilate its dissolved carbon to the atmosphere. The full research paper 'Evolution of South Atlantic density and chemical stratification across the last deglaciation' can be found online at NERC – Science of the Environment.

January

  • Research funding: Congratulations to staff within the Schools of Geography and Biosciences who have received NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility funding at the Autumn 2015 meeting for the following research projects:
    • IP–1579–1115: Prof M Leng (Nottingham) – Has millennial or rapid environmental change forced endemic evolution over the last 1.2Ma?
    • IP–1582–1115: Dr B Lomax – Carbon isotope analysis as a tool to study genome duplication and angiosperm diversification.
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Dr Kara Bogus who has been appointed as a Post Doctoral Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (School of Geography, University of Nottingham and British Geological Survey). Kara is an organic geochemist and her research interests are in formation and alteration of marine kerogen; organic matter diagenesis and preservation; geochemical composition of organic microfossils and sources of variability; development of organic microfossil composition as a kerogenproxy. Kara will be working with Sev Kender, Melanie Leng and Simon Chenery on reconstructing Bay of Bengal palaeoceanography since the Miocene.
  • The following abstracts (including CEG staff) were presented at the Quaternary Research Association Annual Discussion Meeting, Royal Holloway University of London, 6th–8th January:
    • Mackay, A, Seddon, A, Leng, M J, Morley, D, Rioual, P, Swann, G. Isotopic evidence for abrupt cool events in central Asia during the Holocene and Last Interglacial.
    • McClymont, E L, Sanchez Montes, M L, Elmore, A C, Müller, J, Kender, S, Greaves, M, Leng, M J, Elderfield, H. Evolution of Sea surface and Intermediate Water Temperatures through the Pleistocene: Implications for the Mid-Pleistocene Transition.
    • Nichols, M, Kender, S, Woods, M, Zalasiewicz, J, Leng, M J. Inferring the Holocene of the Central Irish Sea Thermocline using stable isotope proxy data from benthic foraminifera.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Matthew Jones on his lead editorial role in the special issue of Quaternary Science Reviews on Water Isotope Systematics, and his paper in the volume on Comparisons of observed and modelled lake δ18O variability with Melanie Leng, Suzanne McGowan, Carol Arrowsmith and Hilary Sloane from the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry.

2015

December

  • PhD position: Proxy-data climate-model comparisons using lake-isotope records of the last 2000 years. This project brings together the paleoclimate data and modelling communities to test ways of comparing data on past climate change with modelled scenarios of that climate. The studentship will involve i) the production of new proxy time series for climate change in the UK over the last 2000 years using lake isotope records ii) the use of isotope enabled climate models to produce past climate change scenarios for the same time period and iii) the development of proxy system models to allow proxy-data climate-model comparisons. The project will be based at the School of Geography, University of Nottingham (lake coring, proxy system model development), the Directorate of Climate and Landscape Change at the British Geological Survey, Keyworth (climate modelling) and the NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility, BGS (isotope analysis) in collaboration with scientists from Loughborough University and the University of Liverpool. The studentship will also include a one month training programme at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Further information please contact Dr Matthew Jones (University of Nottingham).

November

  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Keely Mills (BGS) who has been appointed as a Honorary Research Fellow within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, School of Geography, University of Nottingham. Keely will be collaborating within the CEG on how lake ecosystems have responded to past climate changes from a multi-disciplinary perspective and on understanding how resilient these often vulnerable but ecologically important freshwater resources may be to future climate changes. She is a main collaborator in the "Centre for Environmental Geochemistry - Asian Wetland" theme, a project aimed at investigating human impact in sensitive part of Asia where there has been recent extreme pressure from urbanisation, pollution, mining and agriculture.
  • PhD position: Are land-use decisions of African elephants based on environmental geochemistry? The project will explore the role of environmental geochemistry in land use decisions by wild African elephants. This is a unique, interdisciplinary project involving environmental geochemistry, plant science, and animal health to address research questions which have important and practical implications for wildlife health and conservation. For further information contact Dr Michael Watts (British Geological Survey), Dr Lisa Yon (University of Nottingham, School of Veterinary Medicine & Science), or Professor Martin Broadley (University of Nottingham, Dept. Plant Nutrition).
  • Research news: Dr Liz Bailey from the School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham has been appointed as Visiting Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, British Geological Survey. Liz is a specialist in environmental geochemistry and works on urban risk assessment, soil iodine and selenium geochemistry, dynamics of uranium, thorium and heavy metals and Global Food Security.

October

  • New Appointment: Welcome to Pat Whitelaw who has just started a PhD within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (Faculty of Engineering). Pat’s research project aims to improve our estimation of the UK shale gas reserve. The research will use high pressure water pyrolysis that simulates shale gas generation in the deep sub-surface right through the gas generating window and then provide an understanding on how the gas is retained within the shale. This line of research builds on the new methodology to understand the effects of pressure on oil and gas generation supported by the oil industry. Patrick is being supervised at Nottingham by Colin Snape and at BGS by Chris Vane and Clement Uguna.
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Beckie Draper who has just started a PhD with BGS, University of Nottingham and CEH. Beckie will be working on nanoparticle dynamics in soils and she is beingsupervised by Andy Tye (BGS), Scott Young and Liz Bailey (UoN), and Steve Lofts and Claus Svendsen(CEH). This project was awarded via the STARS CDT.
  • Research News: Professor Martin Broadley (School of Biosciences, UoN) and Dr Louise Ander (Inorganic Geochemistry, BGS) are the CEG principal investigators on a recently awarded BBSRC-NERC Sustainable Agriculture Research and Innovation Club (SARIC) grant Magnesium Network (MAG-NET): Integrating Soil-Crop-Animal Pathways to Improve Ruminant Health. This is a £1.1M total grant, collaborating across the School of Biosciences and School of Veterinary Medicine and Science at UoN, Inorganic Geochemistry at BGS and the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwyth University. The project will run from January 2016 – December 2019.
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Olivier Humphrey who has just started a PhD within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (School of Biosciences and BGS). Olivier’s research project aims to improve our understanding of soil-iodine dynamics and iodine bioavailability to plants. This line of research builds on previous co-operation between BGS and the University of Nottingham and will inform strategies to tackle iodine deficiency, which affects around 2 billion people worldwide. Oliver is being supervised at Nottingham by Scott Young, Neil Crout and Liz Bailey and at the BGS by Michael Watts and Louise Ander.

September

  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Sev Kender (School of Geography and the BGS) on his contribution to the Nature Geoscience paper: A record of spontaneous subduction initiation in the Izu–Bonin–Mariana arc. Nature Geoscience. The University of Nottingham press release: Scientists discover how tectonic plates collide.

July

  • Stable Isotope Research Geochemist: We have a 3 year fixed term appointment for a research geochemist within the Stable Isotope Facility, BGS, primarily to conduct collaborative research in stable isotope mass spectrometry that comprises areas including hydrochemistry, biogeochemistry, soil science, pollution, sedimentary processes, and human-landscape interactions. Closing date 1.9.15.
    More information

June

  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Edward Joy (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) on his appointment as a Visiting Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (BGS).
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Munir Zia (Fauji Fertilizer Company Limited, Pakistan) on his appointment as a Visiting Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (BGS).
  • Research funding: Congratulations to staff within the School of Geography and Department of Archaeology who have received NERC Isotope Geosciences Facility funding at the Spring meeting for the following research projects:
    • Dr Matthew Jones, Dr Alexandra Livarda and Leslie Bode - Palaeobotanical and palaeoenvironmental investigations of hunter-gatherers at Kharaneh IV, Azraq Basin, Jordan.
    • Dr George Swann and Prof Melanie Leng - The effects of differential dissolution on the O isotope composition of diatom silica.
    • Dr Sev Kender and Prof Melanie Leng - North Sea Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM): carbon release rates and environmental impacts.
  • PhD success: Congratulations to Dr Edward Joy who has successfully defended his PhD thesis entitled "Dietary mineral deficiencies in Sub-Saharan Africa". Edward was supervised by Prof Martin Broadley, Prof Colin Black, Dr Scott Young (Biosciences, UoN), Dr Louise Ander, Dr Michael Watts (Inorganic Geochemistry, BGS).
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Dr Andy Marriott who has been appointed as an analytical chemist within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (Inorganic Geochemistry, BGS). Andy’s research interests are in the application of biogeochemical structures in identifying natal origin of marine and freshwater fish and on the bioaccumulation of toxic heavy metals in fish tissue and their effects on food security in developing countries.

May

  • New Appointment: Welcome to Dr Lyndsey Fox who has been appointed as a Post Doctoral Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (School of Geography, University of Nottingham and British Geological Survey). Lyndsey is a micropalaeontologist and palaeoeanographer and has just returned from IODP Expedition 354 Bengal Fan collecting sediment cores to investigate past changes in the ocean. Lyndsey will be working with Sev Kender, Melanie Leng and Simon Chenery on reconstructing Bay of Bengal palaeoceanography since the Miocene.
  • Research Fellowship: Applications are invited for a Research Fellow (Asian wetland research) to be based at the University of Nottingham (School of Geography) and the British Geological Survey. The post is within the combined Centre for Environmental Geochemistry which has a range of world class facilities for palaeoenvironmental change research including geochemical and isotope laboratories. Closing date: 7th July 2015.
    Apply now
  • Research News: Congratulations to Prof Melanie Leng who has been made an Associate Editor with the Journal of Paleolimnology. This journal provides a vehicle for the rapid dissemination of original scientific work dealing with the reconstruction of lake histories, and studies of river, wetland, peatland and estuary systems. It continues to be a major repository for papers dealing with climatic change, as well as other pressing topics, such as global environmental change, lake acidification, eutrophication, long-term monitoring, and other aspects of lake histories ontogeny.

April

February

January

  • Research news: Congratulations to Dr Sev Kender who has been invited to take part in the IODP MagellanPlus Workshop "Drilling the Cretaceous–Palaeogene tropical South Atlantic" in Newcastle 2-4 February 2015. This meeting will be exploring an IODP proposal aimed at understanding the rifting history of the South Atlantic and the evolution of the oceans including Ocean Anoxic Events.
  • Research news: Congratulations to Dr Sev Kender who has been invited to take part in the ICDP workshop "Coring North Sea Cenozoic (CONOSC)" in Utrecht 18-21 March 2015. The meeting will focus on developing a full proposal to core the southern North Sea to reconstruct past climatic change over NW Europe, including Eocene hyperthermals.
  • PhD success: Congratulations to Dr Darren Beriro for successfully defending his PhD thesis 'Gene Expression Programming Models of Bioaccessible Benzo[a]pyrene in Coking Works Soils'. Darren was supervised at University of Nottingham by Paul Nathanail and Bob Abrahart, and at the BGS by Mark Cave and Joanna Wragg. Darren now works at the BGS as an environmental geochemist focussing on data interrogation, modelling and meaning.

2014

December

  • Outreach: Jonathan Lewis and Melanie Leng. Snail shells provide detailed records of environmental change. Climatica.
  • Research news: Abida Usman has joined CEG as a PhD student working on "Source apportionment of urban contaminants". Her supervisory team is Dr Scott Young and Dr Liz Bailey (Biosciences, UoN) and Dr Louise Ander and Dr Simon Chenery (BGS).
  • PhD position: "Characterisation of Iron bioavailability from African soils" with University of Nottingham and the British Geological Survey.
  • PhD position: "Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the last greenhouse" with University of Nottingham and the British Geological Survey.
  • PhD position: "Development of Reference Doses for Mixtures: Risk Assessment of Cadmium, Iron and Zinc Interactions" with The James Hutton Institute, University of Nottingham and the British Geological Survey.
  • Research news: Prof Julian Henderson from the Department of Archaeology, University of Nottingham, has been appointed as Visiting Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, British Geological Survey. Julian’s research interests include understand the sources and roles of geological and environmental materials such as sand, plants or clays in the production and trade of ancient materials including glass and pottery and investigating the impact of ancient mining and material production on the environment both in the past and in the present.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Prof Chris Richardson (Bangor), Simon Chenery and Phil Hollyman (joint PhD student) on their successful application to the NERC Ion Microprobe Facility for elemental and isotope data in support of the project: "Assessing the timing of growth increment formation in the statoliths of the common whelk Buccinum undatum".
  • Research News: Congratulations to Judith Garforth who recently successfully defended her PhD entitled ‘Lability and solubility of Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in UK soils’. The project was a joint CEH (Lancaster) - BGS – University of Nottingham studentship, and Judith was supervised by Dr Steve Lofts (CEH Lancaster), Drs Scott Young and Liz Bailey (UoN) and Dr Andy Tye (BGS).

November

  • Research News: Uguna, C.N., Carr, A.D., Snape, C.E., Meredith, W. 2015. High pressure water pyrolysis of coal to evaluate the role of pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities under geological conditions. Organic Geochemistry, 78, 44-51.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Prof Julian Henderson (with Prof Jane Evans and PhD student Jingyi Shen et al.) on their successful application to the NERC Isotope Geosciences Facilities for isotope data in support of the project: “Provenance and Technology of ceramic glazes in northern China and the Middle East (7th-13th Centuries AD)”.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Matthew Jones (with Prof Sarah Metcalfe, Prof Melanie Leng, Dr Steve Noble et al) on their successful follow up application to the NERC Isotope Geosciences Facilities for isotope data in support of the project: “A new way of life? The earliest farming communities of highland SW Iran”.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Prof Melanie Leng (with Dr Sev Kender, Dr George Swann, PhD student Rowan Dejardin et al.) on their successful application to the NERC Isotope Geosciences Facilities for isotope data in support of the project: “Determining if changes in the position of the Southern Westerly Wind belt impact the South Georgia marine ecosystem”.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr George Swann (with Dr Suzanne McGowan, Prof Melanie Leng, PhD student Mark Stevenson et al.) on their successful follow up application to the NERC Isotope Geosciences Facilities for isotope data in support of the project: “Biological and geochemical records of Holocene carbon cycling Disko Island, western Greenland”.
  • Research news: Congratulations to Dr Naomi Sykes from the Department of Archaeology, University of Nottingham who has been appointed as a Visiting Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, British Geological Survey. Naomi works closely with Dr Angela Lamb and Prof Jane Evans on a variety of isotope-based zooarchaeology projects including the recently awarded AHRC grant: Changing Scientific and Cultural Perspectives on Human-Chicken Interactions.

October

  • Research news: Congratulations to Dr Simon Chenery on his appointment as Honorary Research Fellow within the Department of Archaeology, University of Nottingham. Simon has worked on pottery, flints and teeth with archaeologists across the UK. His current research collaboration with Prof Julian Henderson and Prof Jane Evans is on provanancing and understanding the geochemical characteristics of source materials for Middle Eastern ancient glasses.
  • Research news: Congratulations to Dr Angela Lamb on her appointment as Honorary Research Fellow within the Department of Archaeology, University of Nottingham. Angela’s appointment is due to her role in heading stable isotope-archaeology collaborations within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry and her research with Dr Naomi Sykes and Dr Holly Miller on the AHRC grant: Changing Scientific and Cultural Perspectives on Human-Chicken Interactions.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Jonathan Dean who has been appointed as a Post Doctoral Research Associate (at the BGS and in association with the School of Geography) on NERC Standard Grant: A 500,000–year environmental record from Chew Bahir, south Ethiopia: testing hypotheses of climate-driven human evolution, innovation, and dispersal. Jonathan is currently working as an Isotope Apprentice within the BGS and will transfer to this new post in March 2015.
  • Research news: Congratulations to Rob Ward (Director of Science for Groundwater, BGS) on his appointment as Honorary Professor within the School of Geography. Rob is responsible for managing an integrated programme of research addressing groundwater protection, management and impacts of environmental change at the BGS. His personal research interests include assessing the risks to groundwater from shale gas exploitation, groundwater pollution by nitrates and emerging contaminants, the impacts on groundwater from extreme climate-driven events, and developing better links between science outcomes and policy/decision making.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Matt Jones (with Prof Sarah Metcalfe and Prof Melanie Leng) on their successful application to NERC Isotope Geosciences Facilities on "A new way of life? The earliest farming communities of highland SW Iran".
  • Congratulations to a team of soil scientists including researchers at the University of Nottingham and the BGS for the successful bid to host a soils Centre for Doctoral Training(CDT). The CDT aims to equip a new generation of soil scientists with up-to-date skills and understanding the complexities of soil ecosystems and the role they play in the wider environment. Sacha Mooney (UoN), Murray Lark and Andy Tye (BGS) contributed to the writing of the Consortium bid led by Lancaster University.
  • Research News: Congratulations to Dr Sev Kender from the Centre of Environmental Geochemistry who has won a NERC-IODP small grant to work on reconstructing deep Pacific Ocean circulation since the Oligocene. The project will analyse Nd isotopes in fossil fish teeth collected during IODP Exp. 351 to the Philippine Sea.
  • NERC news: Planet Earth magazine features the launch of the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry in their autumn 2014 edition.
  • New Appointment: Dr Clement Uguna, a geochemist from University of Nottingham, has been appointed to work as a Research Fellow at BGS within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry. He will be assessing UK shale gas reserve using high water pressure pyrolysis technique to simulate shale gas generation. His research will be conducted both at the Organic Geochemistry Facility at the BGS and in the Faculty of Engineering (University of Nottingham).
  • Promotion: Congratulations to Dr Angela Lamb who has been promoted to the position of Senior Scientist within BGS, in part, for her role in heading the stable isotope-archaeology collaboration within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry. This includes her work with Dr Naomi Sykes and Dr Holly Miller on the AHRC grant: Changing Scientific and Cultural Perspectives on Human-Chicken Interactions.

September

  • Research news: Dr Barry Lomax from the School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham has been appointed as Visiting Research Associate within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry, British Geological Survey. Barry’s research interests include palaeopolyploidy and plant genome size over geological time, plant responses to CO2, and sporopollenin chemistry as a palaeoclimate proxy.
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Rowan Dejardin who has just started a PhD within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (School of Geography). Rowan’s thesis research is concerned with understanding past variations in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and its impact on South Georgia ice sheet extent over the Holocene.

August

  • Outreach: Jonathan Dean, Melanie Leng and Anson Mackay. Can isotopes help define the Anthropocene? Climatica.
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Jack Lacey who has recently moved to the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry within the School of Geography to complete his PhD research. Jack is working on how components deposited in lake sediments record aspects of climate and environmental change, especially around the Mediterranean.
  • New Appointment: Welcome to Dr Sev Kender who has been appointed as a Research Fellow within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (School of Geography) and also as an Honorary Research Fellow with the British Geological Survey. Sev is a Micropalaeontologist and Palaeoeanographer and has just returned from an IODP expedition off the coast of Japan, in the Philippine Sea, collecting sediment cores to investigate past changes in the ocean.

July

  • Research news: A cross-sectional study of the association between arsenic consumption from private drinking water supplies and measured biological levels in the population of Cornwall, UK – Project Update July 2014. Further information

June

  • Fellowship scheme: The Anne McLaren Fellowship scheme offers 3-year Fellowships for female researchers in STEM subjects, linked to an established academic post within the University of Nottingham and includes the opportunity for international mobility across the University's Campuses in the UK, Malaysia and China. Fellowships include the opportunity to apply for research and childcare costs. The Centre for Environmental Geochemistry will support applications that fall within the remit of the scheme and the Centre. Please contact Melanie Leng.
Nature
  • Research news: Dr Andrew Tye – Honorary Lecturer at the University of Nottingham
  • Research Project: A new research project has begun to examine the history of chickens, involving archaeological records to investigate the history of the world’s most widely established livestock species, originally descended from the wild jungle fowl of South East Asia. The project, entitled "Cultural and Scientific Perceptions of Human-Chicken Interactions", was made possible with the help of a £1.94 million grant from the AHRC under the Science In Culture Awards Large Grants call. Researchers from Nottingham University, as well as universities of Bournemouth, Durham, Leicester, Roehampton and York, will be examining when and how rapidly domesticated chickens spread across Europe and the history of their exploitation for meat and eggs. Research methods will include stable isotope analysis at the BGS Stable Isotope Facility, in collaboration with the University of Nottingham within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry. For more information see this issue of Nature.

May

April

March

February